HP-branded SSDs (manufactured by Biwin) have over the past few years become one of the more recognizable consumer SSD brands, thanks in large part to the success of the EX920 and EX950 high-end NVMe SSDs. However, they offer a wider range of products, and the SATA drives are now getting an update: The new HP S750 SATA SSD replaces the S700 and to some extent also the S700 Pro models, bringing a more modern budget SATA design using 96-layer 3D NAND.

HP/Biwin partners with Silicon Motion for most of their SSD controllers including the one for this drive, with an unspecified degree of customization for HP. We believe the HP H6578 controller used in the S750 is based on either the SM2259 or its DRAMless counterpart the SM2259XT. Pricing for the S750 has not been announced, but the 3 year warranty with endurance ratings of around 0.6 DWPD indicates this is a low-end SATA drive that will compete against DRAMless and QLC-based SSDs.

HP wasn't specific about what kind of 96-layer 3D NAND is used in the S750, but the existence of a 256GB model with decent performance specs makes it unlikely that they're using QLC NAND. The performance sweet spot for the S750 line is the 512GB model, as the 1TB model comes with lower random read and write performance ratings. This suggests that the 1TB model may be using a different, larger NAND die than the smaller two.

HP S750 SSD Specifications
Capacity 256 GB 512 GB 1 TB
Interface, Form Factor 2.5" SATA 6Gbps
Controller HP H6578 (Silicon Motion)
NAND Unspecified 96-layer 3D NAND
DRAM Unspecified
Sequential Read 560 MB/s
Sequential Write 520 MB/s
4KB Random Read IOPS 55k 90k 74k
4KB Random Write IOPS 79k 89k 80k
Idle Power 0.41 W 0.42 W 0.42 W
Active Power 1.83 W 2.17 W 2.29 W
Write Endurance 160 TB
0.6 DWPD
320 TB
0.6 DWPD
650 TB
0.6 DWPD
Warranty 3 years

 

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  • sing_electric - Monday, July 20, 2020 - link

    Exactly. And frequently non-experts decide who's an "expert" - think of a TV producer trying to find an expert to go on a news show. The most worst place to be is often being an expert in an adjacent field, or one in that field not working on solving a particular problem. They know enough to know the challenges, but haven't been working to find a solution.

    depending on who the expert is, you could have someone who say, designed CPUs for decades but never really did NAND stuff or got that involved with actual process design before say, getting involved in teaching. That person might scoff at the notion that 64 layers would ever be possible - let alone desirable given cost/benefit tradeoffs - and they know enough to convince a lay person - even a very smart one - that they know what they're talking about.
    Reply
  • Samus - Wednesday, July 15, 2020 - link

    I've had good luck with the S600/S700 drives but they are SLOW and noticeable bottlenecks in decently fast (Haswell+) machines as a boot drive. The only drive that has performed worse is the Kingston A400 (which is slower than a hard disk much of the time in sustained READS and writes)

    The S700 Pro is substantially faster, showing the need for this controller to have DRAM cache so the drive doesn't tie itself up with queue thrashes.
    Reply
  • Soulkeeper - Thursday, July 16, 2020 - link

    Hopefully they allow firmware updates for non windows users.
    ie: bootable iso images
    Reply
  • Soulkeeper - Thursday, July 16, 2020 - link

    Please ask them about this ? Reply
  • Tomatotech - Thursday, July 16, 2020 - link

    Why would a tech company bother releasing a 256gb 2.5" SDD in 2020? They sell for 20 dollars each used nowadays, including a 2 year warranty....

    (I wouldn't touch a used HDD, but SSDs are pretty bulletproof and I have no problem with using used ones, and if you're looking after a bunch of computers with tiny drives, it's easy to ensure all important documents are backed up to the cloud anyway.)
    Reply
  • Gigaplex - Thursday, July 16, 2020 - link

    To install into their entry level computers. Reply
  • MartyKinn - Thursday, July 23, 2020 - link

    How difficult is it to clone a harddrive with Acronis? Reply

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