ASUS has started sales of its top of the range mobile workstation, the ProArt StudioBook Pro X. The heavily-packed machine packs in Intel’s Xeon processor, an NVIDIA Quadro RTX video card, and is equipped with a 17-inch Pantone Validated display as well as a ScreenPad 2.0 trackpad. And, fittingly for a workstation-class laptop, the notebook has received certifications from multiple professional software vendors, ensuring that the laptop will work with their software and qualifies for full end-user support.

The ASUS ProArt StudioBook Pro X W730 comes in a premium-looking metallic chassis with a Turquoise Grey finish that houses a 1920x1200 resolution 17-inch NanoEdge display, which offers wide viewing angles as well as an antiglare coating. Developed with workstation/productivity use in mind in mind, the display covers 97% of the DCI-P3 color gamut, is Pantone Validated, and is factory-calibrated to a Delta E<1.5 accuracy, a rare feature for laptops.

Inside the ProArt StudioBook Pro X is Intel’s hexa-core Xeon E-2276M processor, as well as NVIDIA’s Quadro RTX 5000 GPU with 16 GB GDDR6 memory. The system comes with 64 GB of ECC DDR4-2666 DRAM (upgradeable to 128 GB) as well as 4 TB of storage using two PCIe 3.0 x4 SSDs, and one hard drive.

When it comes to connectivity, the ASUS ProArt StudioBook Pro X naturally features everything that modern professionals might require, including Wi-Fi 6, Bluetooth 5.0, two Thunderbolt 3 ports, three USB 3.1 Gen 2 Type-A ports, GbE, an HDMI 2.0 output, an SD 4.0/UHS-II card reader, and a 3.5-mm audio jack for a headset.

In a bid to further improve the comfort of the desktop replacement laptop, the notebook has a keyboard with 19-mm key pitches and a two-millimeter key travel. Meanwhile, like other high-end machines from ASUS today, the ProArt StudioBook Pro X uses ASUS's ScreenPad 2.0 touchpad, which places a small display underneath the trackpad. On the multimedia side of matters, the laptop has Harman Kardon speakers with an amplifier, a microphone array, and an HD webcam.

In terms of bulk, the 17-inch class laptop – while not light – is surprisingly also not particularly heavy: the 2.8-cm thick machine weighs 2.5 just kilograms. Meanwhile, the ProArt StudioBook Pro X is equipped with a 95 Wh 6-cell battery, which is nearly the maximum capacity allowed to carry in airplanes.

The ASUS ProArt StudioBook Pro X
  W730
Primary Display General 17.3-inch LED-backlit
Resolution
Color Gamut
1920×1200
97% DCI-P3
Features Pantone Validated
Factory calibrated to Delta E<1.5 accuracy
CPU Options Intel Xeon E-2276M
6C/12T, 12 MB cache, 2.8 - 4.7 GHz
Graphics Integrated HD Graphics P630 (24 EUs)
Discrete NVIDIA Quadro RTX 5000 16 GB GDDR6
RAM 64 GB DDR4-2666
Storage SSD 2 x PCIe 3.0 x4
HDD 1 x HDD
Capacity 4 TB
Wireless Wi-Fi Intel Wi-Fi 6 (802.11ax)
Bluetooth Bluetooth 5.0
USB 3.1 Gen 2 2 × TB 3 (Type-C)
3 × USB 3.1 Gen 2 Type-A
Thunderbolt 2 × TB 3 (data, DP displays)
Display Outputs 1 × HDMI 2.0
2 × TB3 with DisplayPort
Gigabit Ethernet Yes
Card Reader SD 4.0/UHS-II (312 MB/s)
Webcam HD webcam
Fingerprint Sensor Yes, with Windows Hello support
Other I/O Microphone array, Harman/Kardon stereo speakers, audio jack, ScreenPad 2.0
Battery 95 Wh Li-Poly
Dimensions Width 38.2 cm | 15.04 inch
Depth 26.5 cm | 10.43 inch
Thickness 2.8 cm | 1.11 inch
Weight 2.5 kilograms | 5.51 lbs
Price $4,999.99

The ASUS ProArt StudioBook Pro X is available at MSRP of $4999.99 directly from ASUS as well as its retail partners like Amazon.

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Source: ASUS

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  • boeush - Wednesday, November 20, 2019 - link

    Do you strap a microscope to your face when you use your 8K and 5K 17-inch screens? Or are you one of those who prefers to overpay for hyper-DPI, then runs everything at a 250% magnification factor? Reply
  • PixyMisa - Wednesday, November 20, 2019 - link

    The point of higher DPI is to render more detail, not more content. You are *supposed* to increase the scaling factor, which is why Windows will do it for you automatically.

    1080p at 13" is adequate, if not great. At 17" it's not even adequate.
    Reply
  • npz - Wednesday, November 20, 2019 - link

    > The point of higher DPI is to render more detail, not more content. You are *supposed* to increase the scaling factor, which is why Windows will do it for you automatically.

    If you scale then that means you eyes do not have the optical power to ACTUALLY RESOLVE the details! Because actually being able to use the extra resolution for screen real estate means your eyes CAN resolve the fine details, and thus you don't need to scale. But no one can do that with 4k at this size, ergo, anyone that complains and then scales is being idoitic

    It's like someone complaining about audiophile stuff, then failing every single blind ABX listening test.

    I say this as someone who has better eyes than everyone I know, don't where glasses, and sit FAR away while still using small fonts. I am amazed at how the same people how think they need higher res, STILL scale, use big fonts, and STILL sit so freaking close to their screens. No wonder they all have myopia! And then they get glasses, instead of doing eye exercises, which only make your myopia worse!
    Reply
  • s.yu - Wednesday, November 20, 2019 - link

    "If you scale then that means you eyes do not have the optical power to ACTUALLY RESOLVE the details!"
    I believe many in app contents are not scaled, just the UI.
    Reply
  • timecop1818 - Wednesday, November 20, 2019 - link

    Um, no. UI gets scaled to be visible (and clear), but any actual in-app content like video being worked on, or whatever CAD design you're doing etc remains at 1:1 scaling which means you get much better resolution/clarity and can see better details. Reply
  • npz - Wednesday, November 20, 2019 - link

    No any modern Windows app like the Adobe CC suite will detect the scaling settings or be adjustable and scale accordingly, since their UI would otherwise be unusuable on really hidpi. It's only the legacy/win32 apps that remain 1:1. Windows also has two settings that try to accomodate for that Reply
  • npz - Wednesday, November 20, 2019 - link

    Let me correct: you're right that certain in-app fixed size might not scale, but it all depends, like photos for example if you've set it to fit the window size or width, automatically scales for its default view Reply
  • willis936 - Wednesday, November 20, 2019 - link

    Chill out, grandpa. If you took the cornea's resolution and spread it over the entire FOV you'd get 16K. There are benefits to increasing resolution beyond 1080p. You can choose to not believe it and talk about blind testing without actually performing it. That's your prerogative. Reply
  • npz - Wednesday, November 20, 2019 - link

    And Windows scale for one reason alone: most people's eyesight suck.
    I mean holy shit, the amount of people I see holding their phones less than a foot away from their heads still amazes me.
    Reply
  • MamiyaOtaru - Wednesday, November 20, 2019 - link

    it's not 1080p Reply

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